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Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level

SCAPE Wiki Activity Feed - 19 September 2014 - 6:53am

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Categories: SCAPE

Bono: U2 free album delivery was 'punk rock', now I'll save the music industry - Sydney Morning Herald

Google News Search: "new file format" - 19 September 2014 - 1:30am

Sydney Morning Herald

Bono: U2 free album delivery was 'punk rock', now I'll save the music industry
Sydney Morning Herald
Now Bono has told Time magazine that he's working with Apple on an even bigger project: a new file format that could save the music industry. The band's 14th album will be delivered on the new format. He told Time: "[it will be] an audiovisual ...

and more »
Categories: Technology Watch

Apple, U2 Working On New Music File Format - PropertyOfZack

Google News Search: "new file format" - 18 September 2014 - 9:59pm

Music Times

Apple, U2 Working On New Music File Format
PropertyOfZack
In Time's forthcoming cover story, Bono hints that the band's next record is “about 18 months away” and will be released under the new file format. “I think it's going to get very exciting for the music business,” Bono tells Time, “[it will be] an ...
U2, Apple Working on New Music File Format to Combat Piracy, Create an ...Music Times
U2 And Apple Reveal Their Next Surprise TogetherFDRMX

all 336 news articles »
Categories: Technology Watch

U2, Apple Working on New Music File Format to Combat Piracy, Create an ... - Music Times

Google News Search: "new file format" - 18 September 2014 - 3:37pm

Music Times

U2, Apple Working on New Music File Format to Combat Piracy, Create an ...
Music Times
According to a forthcoming TIME cover story, U2 and Apple are working on a new file format that will be too enticing for music fans to ignore. Bono told the magazine that "he hopes that a new digital music format in the works will prove so irresistibly ...
Apple, U2 Working On New Music File FormatPropertyOfZack
U2 And Apple Reveal Their Next Surprise TogetherFDRMX

all 336 news articles »
Categories: Technology Watch

The return of music DRM?

File Formats Blog - 18 September 2014 - 12:58pm

U2, already the most hated band in the world thanks to its invading millions of iOS devices with unsolicited files, isn’t stopping. An article on Time‘s website tells us, in vague terms, that

Bono, Edge, Adam Clayton and Larry Mullen Jr believe so strongly that artists should be compensated for their work that they have embarked on a secret project with Apple to try to make that happen, no easy task when free-to-access music is everywhere (no) thanks to piracy and legitimate websites such as YouTube. Bono tells TIME he hopes that a new digital music format in the works will prove so irresistibly exciting to music fans that it will tempt them again into buying music—whole albums as well as individual tracks.

It’s hard to read this as anything but an attempt to bring digital rights management (DRM) back to online music distribution. Users emphatically rejected it years ago, and Apple was among the first to drop it. You haven’t really “bought” anything with DRM on it; you’ve merely leased it for as long as the vendor chooses to support it. People will continue to break DRM, if only to avoid the risk of loss. The illegal copies will offer greater value than legal ones.

It would be nice to think that what U2 and Apple really mean is just that the new format will offer so much better quality that people will gladly pay for it, but that’s unlikely. Higher-quality formats such as AAC have been around for a long time, and they haven’t pushed the old standby MP3 out of the picture. Existing levels of quality are good enough for most buyers, and vendors know it.

Time implies that YouTube doesn’t compensate artists for their work. This is false. They often don’t bother with small independent musicians, though they will if they’re reminded hard enough (as Heather Dale found out), but it’s hard to believe that groups with powerful lawyers, such as U2, aren’t being compensated for every view.

DRM and force-feeding of albums are two sides of the same coin of vendor control over our choices. This new move shouldn’t be a surprise.


Tagged: Apple, audio, DRM
Categories: Planet DigiPres

Report: Apple and U2 to Debut New Music File Format - Billboard

Google News Search: "new file format" - 18 September 2014 - 12:48pm

Billboard

Report: Apple and U2 to Debut New Music File Format
Billboard
With consumer behavior, and the record industry with it, predicted to pivot so dramatically towards access over ownership in the next five years, it's questionable whether a new file format, even a low-size, high-quality (and possibly locked down with ...

and more »
Categories: Technology Watch

SCAPE Project Ends on the 30th of September

Open Planets Foundation Blogs - 18 September 2014 - 12:11pm

It is difficult to write that headline. After nearly four years of hard work, worry, setbacks, triumphs, weariness, and exultation, the SCAPE project is finally coming to an end.

I am convinced that I will look back at this period as one of the highlights of my career. I hope that many of my SCAPE colleagues will feel the same way.

I believe SCAPE was an outstanding example of a successful European project, characterised by

  • an impressive level of trouble-free international cooperation;
  • sustained effort and dedication from all project partners;
  • high quality deliverables and excellent review ratings;
  • a large number of amazing results, including more software tools than we can demonstrate in one day!

I also believe SCAPE has made and will continue to make a significant impact on the community and practice of digital preservation. We have achieved this impact through

I would like to thank all the people who contributed to the SCAPE project, who are far too numerous to name here. In particular I would like to thank our General Assembly members, our Executive Board/Sub-project leads, the Work Package leads, and the SCAPE Office, all of whom have contributed to the joy and success of SCAPE.

Finally, I would like to thank the OPF for ensuring that the SCAPE legacy will continue to live and even grow long after the project itself is just a fond memory.

It's been a pleasure folks. Well done!

Preservation Topics: SCAPE
Categories: Planet DigiPres

SCAPE Project Ends on the 30th of September

SCAPE Blog Posts - 18 September 2014 - 12:11pm

It is difficult to write that headline. After nearly four years of hard work, worry, setbacks, triumphs, weariness, and exultation, the SCAPE project is finally coming to an end.

I am convinced that I will look back at this period as one of the highlights of my career. I hope that many of my SCAPE colleagues will feel the same way.

I believe SCAPE was an outstanding example of a successful European project, characterised by

  • an impressive level of trouble-free international cooperation;
  • sustained effort and dedication from all project partners;
  • high quality deliverables and excellent review ratings;
  • a large number of amazing results, including more software tools than we can demonstrate in one day!

I also believe SCAPE has made and will continue to make a significant impact on the community and practice of digital preservation. We have achieved this impact through

I would like to thank all the people who contributed to the SCAPE project, who are far too numerous to name here. In particular I would like to thank our General Assembly members, our Executive Board/Sub-project leads, the Work Package leads, and the SCAPE Office, all of whom have contributed to the joy and success of SCAPE.

Finally, I would like to thank the OPF for ensuring that the SCAPE legacy will continue to live and even grow long after the project itself is just a fond memory.

It's been a pleasure folks. Well done!

Preservation Topics: SCAPE
Categories: SCAPE

Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level

OPF Wiki Activity Feed - 18 September 2014 - 5:57am

Page edited by Jette Junge

View Online | Add Comment Jette Junge 2014-09-18T05:57:56Z

Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level

SCAPE Wiki Activity Feed - 18 September 2014 - 5:57am

Page edited by Jette Junge

View Online | Add Comment Jette Junge 2014-09-18T05:57:56Z
Categories: SCAPE

Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level > Elcovs Fay.jpg

OPF Wiki Activity Feed - 18 September 2014 - 5:56am

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Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level > Elcovs Fay.jpg

SCAPE Wiki Activity Feed - 18 September 2014 - 5:56am

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Categories: SCAPE

Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level > Elcovs King.jpg

OPF Wiki Activity Feed - 18 September 2014 - 5:55am

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Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level > Elcovs King.jpg

SCAPE Wiki Activity Feed - 18 September 2014 - 5:55am

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Categories: SCAPE

Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level > Elcovs Giaretta.jpg

OPF Wiki Activity Feed - 18 September 2014 - 5:55am

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SCAPE Wiki Activity Feed - 18 September 2014 - 5:55am

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Categories: SCAPE

Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level - a workshop report

Open Planets Foundation Blogs - 18 September 2014 - 5:52am

On Monday 8 September 2014 APARSEN and SCAPE together hosted a workshop, called ‘Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level’. The workshop was held in connection with the conference Digital Libraries 2014 in London.

The room for the workshop was ‘The Great Hall’ at City University London – a lovely, old, large room with a stage at one end and lots of space for the 12 stalls featuring the invited projects and  the 85 attendees.

The first half of the workshop was dedicated to a panel session. The three panellists each had 10-15 minutes to present their views on both the achievements and future of digital preservation, followed by a discussion moderated by Hildelies Balk from the Royal Library of the Netherlands, with real time visualisations made by Elco van Staveren.

‘As a community we have failed’

With these words David Giaretta, Director of APARSEN (see presentation and visualisation), pinpointed the fact that there will be no EU funding for digital preservation research in the future and that the EU expects to see some result from the 100 M € already distributed. The EU sees data as the new gold, and we should start mining it! A big difference between gold and data is that gold does not perish whereas data is not imperishable.

The important thing to do is to create some results – ‘A rising tide floats all boats’ – if we can at least show something that can be used, that will help funding the rest of the preservation.

Let’s climb the wall!

David Giaretta was followed by Ross King, Project Coordinator of SCAPE (see presentation and visualisation), who started his presentation with a comparison between the two EU projects Planets and SCAPE - the latter being a follow-up project from the first. Many issues already addressed in Planets were further explored and developed in SCAPE, the biggest difference being scalability – how to handle large volumes, scalability in planning processes, more automation etc. – which was the focal point of SCAPE.

To Ross King there were three lessons learned from working with Planets and SCAPE:

  • there is still a wall between Production on one side and Research & Development on the other, 
  • the time issue – although libraries, archives etc. work with long term horizons, most business have a planning horizon of five years or less,
  • format migration  may not be as important as we thought it was.
Who will pay?

Ed Fay, director of Open Planets Foundation (see presentation and visualisation), opened with the message that by working with digital preservation we have a great responsibility of helping to define the future of information management. With no future EU funded projects community collaboration on all levels is more needed than ever. Shared services and infrastructure are essential.

The Open Planets Foundation was founded after the Planets project to help sustaining the results of this project. Together with SCAPE and other projects OPF is now trying to mature tools so they can be widely adopted and sustained (See SCAPE Final Sustainability Plan).

There are a lot of initiatives and momentum, from DPC, NDIPP or JISC to OPF or APA - but how will the future look like? How do we ensure that initiatives are aligned up to the policy level?

Sustainability is about working out who pays – and when…

If digital preservation was delivering business objectives we wouldn’t be here to talk about sustainability - it would just be embedded in how organisations work - we are not there yet!

A diverse landscape with many facets

The panellist’s presentations were followed by questions from the audience, mostly concerned about risk approach. During the discussion it was stated that although the three presenters see the digital landscape from different views they all agree on its importance. People do need to preserve and to get digital value from that. The DP initiatives and organisations are the shopping window, members have lots of skills that the market could benefit from.

The audience were asked if they find it important to have a DP community - apparently nobody disagreed! And it seemed that almost everyone were members of OPF, APARSEN or other similar initiatives.

There are not many H2020 digital preservation bids. In earlier days everybody had several proposals running in these rounds, but this is not catastrophic – good research has been made and now we want the products to be consolidated. We would like to reach a point where digital preservation is an infrastructure service as obvious as your email. But we are not there yet!

Appraisal and ingest is still not solved - we need to choose the data to be preserved, especially when talking about petabytes!

The wrap-up of the discussion was done by discussing the visualisation made by Elco van Staveren.

An overall comment was that even though there are no money directed towards digital preservation, there is still lots of money for problems that can be solved by digital preservation. It is important that the community of digital preservation thinks of itself NOT as the problem but as part of the solution. And although the visualisation is mostly about sustainability, risks still play an important part. If you cannot explain the risk of doing nothing you cannot persuade anyone to pay!

Clinic with experts

After the panel and one minute project elevator pitches there was a clinic session at which all the different projects could present themselves and their results at different stalls. A special clinic table was in turn manned by experts from different areas of digital preservation.

This was the time to meet a lot of different people from the Digital Preservation field, to catch up and build new relations.  For a photo impression of the workshop see: http://bit.ly/1u7Lmnq.

Preservation Topics: SCAPE AttachmentSize IMG_9928.JPG1.75 MB Elcovs discussion.jpg134.17 KB IMG_3361.JPG311.72 KB IMG_3325.JPG409.54 KB
Categories: Planet DigiPres

Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level - a workshop report

SCAPE Blog Posts - 18 September 2014 - 5:52am

On Monday 8 September 2014 APARSEN and SCAPE together hosted a workshop, called ‘Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level’. The workshop was held in connection with the conference Digital Libraries 2014 in London.

The room for the workshop was ‘The Great Hall’ at City University London – a lovely, old, large room with a stage at one end and lots of space for the 12 stalls featuring the invited projects and  the 85 attendees.

The first half of the workshop was dedicated to a panel session. The three panellists each had 10-15 minutes to present their views on both the achievements and future of digital preservation, followed by a discussion moderated by Hildelies Balk from the Royal Library of the Netherlands, with real time visualisations made by Elco van Staveren.

‘As a community we have failed’

With these words David Giaretta, Director of APARSEN (see presentation and visualisation), pinpointed the fact that there will be no EU funding for digital preservation research in the future and that the EU expects to see some result from the 100 M € already distributed. The EU sees data as the new gold, and we should start mining it! A big difference between gold and data is that gold does not perish whereas data is not imperishable.

The important thing to do is to create some results – ‘A rising tide floats all boats’ – if we can at least show something that can be used, that will help funding the rest of the preservation.

Let’s climb the wall!

David Giaretta was followed by Ross King, Project Coordinator of SCAPE (see presentation and visualisation), who started his presentation with a comparison between the two EU projects Planets and SCAPE - the latter being a follow-up project from the first. Many issues already addressed in Planets were further explored and developed in SCAPE, the biggest difference being scalability – how to handle large volumes, scalability in planning processes, more automation etc. – which was the focal point of SCAPE.

To Ross King there were three lessons learned from working with Planets and SCAPE:

  • there is still a wall between Production on one side and Research & Development on the other, 
  • the time issue – although libraries, archives etc. work with long term horizons, most business have a planning horizon of five years or less,
  • format migration  may not be as important as we thought it was.
Who will pay?

Ed Fay, director of Open Planets Foundation (see presentation and visualisation), opened with the message that by working with digital preservation we have a great responsibility of helping to define the future of information management. With no future EU funded projects community collaboration on all levels is more needed than ever. Shared services and infrastructure are essential.

The Open Planets Foundation was founded after the Planets project to help sustaining the results of this project. Together with SCAPE and other projects OPF is now trying to mature tools so they can be widely adopted and sustained (See SCAPE Final Sustainability Plan).

There are a lot of initiatives and momentum, from DPC, NDIPP or JISC to OPF or APA - but how will the future look like? How do we ensure that initiatives are aligned up to the policy level?

Sustainability is about working out who pays – and when…

If digital preservation was delivering business objectives we wouldn’t be here to talk about sustainability - it would just be embedded in how organisations work - we are not there yet!

A diverse landscape with many facets

The panellist’s presentations were followed by questions from the audience, mostly concerned about risk approach. During the discussion it was stated that although the three presenters see the digital landscape from different views they all agree on its importance. People do need to preserve and to get digital value from that. The DP initiatives and organisations are the shopping window, members have lots of skills that the market could benefit from.

The audience were asked if they find it important to have a DP community - apparently nobody disagreed! And it seemed that almost everyone were members of OPF, APARSEN or other similar initiatives.

There are not many H2020 digital preservation bids. In earlier days everybody had several proposals running in these rounds, but this is not catastrophic – good research has been made and now we want the products to be consolidated. We would like to reach a point where digital preservation is an infrastructure service as obvious as your email. But we are not there yet!

Appraisal and ingest is still not solved - we need to choose the data to be preserved, especially when talking about petabytes!

The wrap-up of the discussion was done by discussing the visualisation made by Elco van Staveren.

An overall comment was that even though there are no money directed towards digital preservation, there is still lots of money for problems that can be solved by digital preservation. It is important that the community of digital preservation thinks of itself NOT as the problem but as part of the solution. And although the visualisation is mostly about sustainability, risks still play an important part. If you cannot explain the risk of doing nothing you cannot persuade anyone to pay!

Clinic with experts

After the panel and one minute project elevator pitches there was a clinic session at which all the different projects could present themselves and their results at different stalls. A special clinic table was in turn manned by experts from different areas of digital preservation.

This was the time to meet a lot of different people from the Digital Preservation field, to catch up and build new relations.  For a photo impression of the workshop see: http://bit.ly/1u7Lmnq.

Preservation Topics: SCAPE AttachmentSize IMG_9928.JPG1.75 MB Elcovs discussion.jpg134.17 KB IMG_3361.JPG311.72 KB IMG_3325.JPG409.54 KB
Categories: SCAPE

Welcoming the Newest Member of the Viewshare Team to the Library

The Signal: Digital Preservation - 17 September 2014 - 3:49pm

The following is a guest post by Patrick Rourke, an Information Technology Specialist and the newest member of the Library’s Viewshare team.

patrick-rourke2I made my first forays into computing on days when it was too cold, wet or snowy to walk in the woods behind our house, in a room filled with novels, atlases and other books.  Usually those first programming projects had something to do with books, or writing, or language – trying to generate sentences from word lists, or altering the glyphs the computer used for text to represent different alphabets.

After a traumatic high school exposure to the COBOL programming language (Edsger Dijkstra once wrote that “its teaching should be regarded as a criminal offense” (pdf)), in college I became fascinated with the study of classical Greek and Roman history and literature. I was particularly drawn to the surviving fragments of lost books from antiquity – works that were not preserved, but of which traces remain in small pieces of papyrus, in palimpsests, and through quotations in other works. I spent a lot of my free time in the computer room, using GML, BASIC and ftp on the university’s time sharing system.

My first job after graduation was on the staff of a classics journal, researching potential contributors, proofreading, checking references. At that time, online academic journals and electronic texts were being distributed via email and the now almost-forgotten medium of Gopher. It was an exciting time, as people experimented with ways to leverage these new tools to work with books, then images, then the whole panoply of cultural content.

This editorial experience led to a job in the technical publications department of a research company, and my interest in computing to a role as the company webmaster, and then as an IT specialist, working with applications, servers and networking. In my spare time, I stayed engaged with the humanities, doing testing, web design and social media engagement for the Suda On Line project, who publish a collaborative translation and annotation of the 10th century Byzantine lexicon in which many of those fragments of lost books are found.

My work on corporate intranets and my engagement with SOL motivated me to work harder on extending my programming skills, so before long I was developing web applications to visualize project management data and pursuing a master’s degree in computer science.  In the ten years I’ve been working as a developer, I’ve learned a lot about software development in multiple languages, frameworks and platforms, worked with some great teams and been inspired by great mentors.

I join the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program as an Information Technology Specialist, uniting my interests in culture and computing. My primary project is Viewshare, a platform the Library makes available to cultural institutions for generating customized visualizations – including timelines, maps, and charts – of digital collections data. We will be rolling out a new version of Viewshare in the near future, and then I will be working with the NDIIPP team and the Viewshare user community on enhancing the platform by developing new features and new ways to view and share digital collections data. I’m looking forward to learning from and working with my new colleagues at the Library of Congress and everyone in the digital preservation community.

Categories: Planet DigiPres

Commercial PDF-A Validators with Trial Functionality

OPF Wiki Activity Feed - 16 September 2014 - 3:42pm

Page edited by Marc Fresko

View Online Marc Fresko 2014-09-16T15:42:48Z