Feed aggregator

Evaluation of patients age for a given period > ageChart.png

OPF Wiki Activity Feed - 18 July 2014 - 12:11pm

File edited by Tomasz Hoffmann

PNG File ageChart.png (41 kB)

View Attachments Tomasz Hoffmann 2014-07-18T12:11:01Z

Evaluation of patients age for a given period > ageChart.png

SCAPE Wiki Activity Feed - 18 July 2014 - 12:11pm

File edited by Tomasz Hoffmann

PNG File ageChart.png (41 kB)

View Attachments Tomasz Hoffmann 2014-07-18T12:11:01Z
Categories: SCAPE

raw2nexus Experiment at STFC > PreCoffeeTB3.ppt

OPF Wiki Activity Feed - 18 July 2014 - 9:44am

File attached by Catherine Jones

Microsoft Powerpoint 97 Slideshow PreCoffeeTB3.ppt (2.11 MB) - Talk for Scientific Computing Department

View Attachments Catherine Jones 2014-07-18T09:44:50Z

raw2nexus Experiment at STFC > PreCoffeeTB3.ppt

SCAPE Wiki Activity Feed - 18 July 2014 - 9:44am

File attached by Catherine Jones

Microsoft Powerpoint 97 Slideshow PreCoffeeTB3.ppt (2.11 MB) - Talk for Scientific Computing Department

View Attachments Catherine Jones 2014-07-18T09:44:50Z
Categories: SCAPE

Estonia to adopt new digital document format in 2015 - The Baltic Course

Google News Search: "new file format" - 18 July 2014 - 9:04am

The Baltic Course

Estonia to adopt new digital document format in 2015
The Baltic Course
Starting 1 January 2015, a new file format BDOC will become valid in Estonia for digitally signing documents, which has been developed according to the international ETSI (European Telecommunications Standards Institute) standards, writes LETA/Eesti ...

Categories: Technology Watch

Preserving Born Digital News at Digital Preservation 2014

The Signal: Digital Preservation - 17 July 2014 - 7:33pm

The following is a guest post from Anne Wootton, CEO of Pop Up Archive, which makes tools for preserving and creating access to digital spoken word; Edward McCain, the Digital Curator of Journalism at the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute at the University of Missouri; Leslie Johnston, Direction of Digital Preservation at the National Archives and Records Administration; and Aurelia Moser, a librarian-journalist and current Knight-Mozilla OpenNews fellow.

As everyone gears up for the annual Digital Preservation 2014 conference next week, we’re excited to crash the party with a bunch of journalists.

In all seriousness: we proposed our session for DigiPres 2014 in reaction to growing alarm among journalists that as news is increasingly digital in nature, news organizations don’t have the expertise or resources to properly archive or preserve their digital work for future generations — or even to preserve their work for a year from now.

This is true at small regional newspapers struggling to maintain a web presence and keep digital backups of their articles, images and videos. It’s also true at the biggest national news organizations building interactive news apps and data-driven journalism projects.

Important initiatives like the National Digital Newspaper Program (a partnership of the Library of Congress and the National Endowment for the Humanities) are helping save the legacy of print journalism for future generations. Educopia published a guide to digital newspaper preservation for libraries and cultural heritage institutions this year.

But what about the digital news being created today, especially given its state of continual flux and evolution?

One of us, Edward McCain, has written: “The problems surrounding preservation of and access to digital news archives stem from a combination of frequently changing factors. …[Losing digital] news, birth announcements, obituaries and feature stories about the happenings in any community represents a loss of cultural heritage and identity. It also has an effect on the news ecosystem, since reporters often depend on the ‘morgue’ – newspaper parlance for their library – to add background and context to their stories.”

For example, at a gathering of journalists last fall, Scott Klein of ProPublica told the story of Adrian Holovaty’s Chicago Crime, a groundbreaking news application that is now lost to the world. “What do we want to know in 2014 about that app? What would we want to know in 2034? It’s not just the code that Adrian wrote or the map itself … We want to know about his process. We want to know the infrastructure on which he built the app … We want to know about how it was designed, how the user interactions worked. We want to know the impact it had and who responded to it.”

In our Digital Preservation 2014 session on Wednesday 7/23 we will share stories from our varied experiences in digital news production and archiving. We come from different backgrounds, but we share in common a desire to better unite journalists and news organizations with archivists and the archival communities best equipped to provide them with resources. For starters, we thought we’d kick off the conversation with early results from a born-digital news archiving survey conducted by Edward and RJI.

RJI’s Journalism Digital News Archive initiative was launched in 2013 with the mission of finding and implementing viable solutions for saving news content originally produced in a digital format. There are a number of challenges implicit in this undertaking, not the least of which is that we don’t know a lot about the current state of born-digital news archives.

A recent RJI/JDNA survey addresses this knowledge deficit about the policies and practices of news organizations when it comes to born-digital content. In a survey of 476 news organizations, the largest group questioned, with 406 respondents, was denoted as “Hybrid” enterprises: print newspapers with an online platform. The smaller group of 70 respondents was denoted “Online Only:” organizations that publish their content via the World Wide Web exclusively.

The survey asks about content production; what kinds of digital objects are these news organizations creating? Edward and his team asked about the basics such as text and images, but also about video, interactive, mobile-only and other formats, starting with: “Does your news organization produce born-digital text content?” (Respondents were given a working definition of born-digital content: “materials that originate in a digital form, not scanned from other media. Examples include digital photographs, digital documents, harvested web content, digital manuscripts, electronic records, and etc.”)

It should come as no surprise that the vast majority of news organizations create digital content in text format (Figure 1). But what does it mean that 6% of Hybrid enterprises report that they don’t produce text? It could be that they are engaged in some unorthodox business model or perhaps they didn’t really understand the question. If those 6% of survey respondents really find the language or concepts behind the question about born-digital text formats, it may indicate a more general disconnect between journalistic and digital preservation cultures.

Born-digital news text produced.png

Figure 1. Does your news organization produce born-digital text content?

RJI’s survey also asked about the use of Content Management Systems for storage and retrieval as well as what other kinds of technology were currently in use for providing access to digital news archives (Figure 2). More than twice the percentage (47 percent) of Online Only organizations store and retrieve their digital content on their own CMS versus Hybrid news producers (20 percent). As with many of the responses, the difference here may be due to the age and size of each type of organization.

retrieve BDNC.png

Figure 2. Do you store and retrieve born-digital content using a CMS?

Edward and his team also asked organizations about the completeness of their born-digital archives, how far back they have access to those files, and whether or not they work with a memory institution such as a library, museum or archive to preserve their electronic news assets. The survey asked about the value of born-digital news archives from different perspectives: historical content creation, audience engagement, quality journalism and return on investment. It also asked about loss of digital content as well as perceived threats in areas such as media failure, technical obsolescence, policy and resources. And since librarians – not journalists – have been the driving force behind the creation and preservation of news archives, the survey asked organizations if they employed a news librarian or equivalent position.

Please join us at Digital Preservation 2014 from 10:45–noon on Wednesday, July 23rd in the West End Ballroom Salon C to hear the answers to these questions and to share your ideas about how digital preservationists can join force with journalists and other stakeholders to improve preservation and access for digital news content.

Our 2014 Digital Preservation Born Digital News Archiving panel is a continuation of initiatives that many of us are already involved in with colleagues from the Reynolds Journalism Institute, the Newseum, the Mozilla Foundation, the NYTimes, ProPublica, and the Washington Post. Read more here:

Please leave a comment below with thoughts on the topic or ideas in advance of the meeting. We welcome all questions and suggestions.

Categories: Planet DigiPres

pronomutils: update SOAP URL

Fido Development Activity - 17 July 2014 - 6:13pm
pronomutils: update SOAP URL

pronomutils: write only takes a single argument

Fido Development Activity - 17 July 2014 - 6:08pm
pronomutils: write only takes a single argument

Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level

OPF Wiki Activity Feed - 17 July 2014 - 2:48pm

Page edited by Melanie Imming

View Online | Add Comment Melanie Imming 2014-07-17T14:48:53Z

Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level

SCAPE Wiki Activity Feed - 17 July 2014 - 2:48pm

Page edited by Melanie Imming

View Online | Add Comment Melanie Imming 2014-07-17T14:48:53Z
Categories: SCAPE

Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level > Elcovs.jpg

OPF Wiki Activity Feed - 17 July 2014 - 2:47pm

File attached by Melanie Imming

JPEG File Elcovs.jpg (463 kB)

View Attachments Melanie Imming 2014-07-17T14:47:10Z

Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level > Elcovs.jpg

SCAPE Wiki Activity Feed - 17 July 2014 - 2:47pm

File attached by Melanie Imming

JPEG File Elcovs.jpg (463 kB)

View Attachments Melanie Imming 2014-07-17T14:47:10Z
Categories: SCAPE

A VM4C3PO

Open Planets Foundation Blogs - 17 July 2014 - 2:36pm

We have just set up a vagrant environment for C3PO. It starts a headless vm where the C3PO related functionalities (Mongodb, Play, a downloadable commandline jar) are managable from the host's browser. Further, the vm itself has all relevant processes configured at start-up independently from vagrant, so it can be, once created, downloaded and used as a stand-alone C3PO vm. We think this could be a scenario applicable to other SCAPE projects as well. The following is a summary of the ideas we've had and the experiences we've made.

The Result

The Vagrantfile and a directory containing all vagrant-relevant files live directly in the root directory of the C3PO repository. So after installing Vagrant and cloning the repository a simple 'vagrant up' should do all the work, as downloading the base box, installing the necessary software and booting the new vm.

After a few minutes one should have a running vm that is accessible from the hosts browser at localhost:8000. This opens a central welcome page that contains information about the vm-specific aspects and links to the playframework's url (localhost:9000) and the Mongodb admin interface (localhost:28017). It also provides a download link for the command-line jar, which has to be used in order to import data. This can be used from the outside of the vm as the Mongodb port is mapped as well. So I can import and analyse data with C3PO without having to fiddle through the setup challenges myself, and, believe me, that way can be long and stony.

The created image is self-contained in that sense that, if I put it on a server, anyone who has Virtualbox installed can download it and use it, without having to rely on vagrant working on their machine.

General Setup

The provisioning script has a number of tasks:

  • it downloads all required dependencies for building the C3PO environment
  • it installs a fresh C3PO (from /vagrant, which is the shared folder connection between the git repository and the vm) and assembles the command-line app
  • it installs and runs a Mongodb server
  • it installs and runs the Playframework
  • it creates a port-forwarded static welcome page with links to all the functionalities above
  • it adds all above to the native ubuntu startup (using /etc/rc.local, if necessary), so that an image of the vm can theoretically be run independently from the vagrant environment

These are all trivial steps, but it can make a difference not having to manually implement all of them.

Getting rid of proxy issues

In case you're behind one of those very common NTLM company proxies, you'll really like that the only thing you have to provide is a config script with some some details around your proxy. If the setup script detects this file, it will download the necessary software and configure maven to use it. Doing it in this way has been actually the first time I got maven running smoothly on a linux VM behind our proxy.

Ideas for possible next steps

There is loads left to do, here are a few ideas:

  • provide interesting initial test-data that ships with the box, so that people can play around with C3PO without having to install/import anything at all.
  • why not having a vm for more SCAPE projects? we could quickly create a repository for something like a SCAPE base vm configuration that is useable as a base for other vms. The central welcome page could be pre-configured (SCAPE branded) as well as all the proxy- and development-environment-related stuff mentioned above.
  • I'm not sure about the sustainablity of shell provisioning scripts with increasing complexity of the bootstrap process. Grouping the shell commands in functions is certainly an improvement, it might be worth though to check out other, more dynamic provisioners. One I find particularly interesting is Ansible.
  • currently there's no way of testing that the vm works with the current development trunk; a test environment that runs the vm and tests for all the relevant connection bits would be handy

 

Preservation Topics: SCAPE
Categories: Planet DigiPres

A VM4C3PO

SCAPE Blog Posts - 17 July 2014 - 2:36pm

We have just set up a vagrant environment for C3PO. It starts a headless vm where the C3PO related functionalities (Mongodb, Play, a downloadable commandline jar) are managable from the host's browser. Further, the vm itself has all relevant processes configured at start-up independently from vagrant, so it can be, once created, downloaded and used as a stand-alone C3PO vm. We think this could be a scenario applicable to other SCAPE projects as well. The following is a summary of the ideas we've had and the experiences we've made.

The Result

The Vagrantfile and a directory containing all vagrant-relevant files live directly in the root directory of the C3PO repository. So after installing Vagrant and cloning the repository a simple 'vagrant up' should do all the work, as downloading the base box, installing the necessary software and booting the new vm.

After a few minutes one should have a running vm that is accessible from the hosts browser at localhost:8000. This opens a central welcome page that contains information about the vm-specific aspects and links to the playframework's url (localhost:9000) and the Mongodb admin interface (localhost:28017). It also provides a download link for the command-line jar, which has to be used in order to import data. This can be used from the outside of the vm as the Mongodb port is mapped as well. So I can import and analyse data with C3PO without having to fiddle through the setup challenges myself, and, believe me, that way can be long and stony.

The created image is self-contained in that sense that, if I put it on a server, anyone who has Virtualbox installed can download it and use it, without having to rely on vagrant working on their machine.

General Setup

The provisioning script has a number of tasks:

  • it downloads all required dependencies for building the C3PO environment
  • it installs a fresh C3PO (from /vagrant, which is the shared folder connection between the git repository and the vm) and assembles the command-line app
  • it installs and runs a Mongodb server
  • it installs and runs the Playframework
  • it creates a port-forwarded static welcome page with links to all the functionalities above
  • it adds all above to the native ubuntu startup (using /etc/rc.local, if necessary), so that an image of the vm can theoretically be run independently from the vagrant environment

These are all trivial steps, but it can make a difference not having to manually implement all of them.

Getting rid of proxy issues

In case you're behind one of those very common NTLM company proxies, you'll really like that the only thing you have to provide is a config script with some some details around your proxy. If the setup script detects this file, it will download the necessary software and configure maven to use it. Doing it in this way has been actually the first time I got maven running smoothly on a linux VM behind our proxy.

Ideas for possible next steps

There is loads left to do, here are a few ideas:

  • provide interesting initial test-data that ships with the box, so that people can play around with C3PO without having to install/import anything at all.
  • why not having a vm for more SCAPE projects? we could quickly create a repository for something like a SCAPE base vm configuration that is useable as a base for other vms. The central welcome page could be pre-configured (SCAPE branded) as well as all the proxy- and development-environment-related stuff mentioned above.
  • I'm not sure about the sustainablity of shell provisioning scripts with increasing complexity of the bootstrap process. Grouping the shell commands in functions is certainly an improvement, it might be worth though to check out other, more dynamic provisioners. One I find particularly interesting is Ansible.
  • currently there's no way of testing that the vm works with the current development trunk; a test environment that runs the vm and tests for all the relevant connection bits would be handy

 

Preservation Topics: SCAPE
Categories: SCAPE

Muster In! Training Needs Assessment from DPOE

The Signal: Digital Preservation - 17 July 2014 - 1:21pm

The following is a guest post by Barrie Howard, IT Project Manager at the Library of Congress.

Image from Frank Leslie's illustrated newspaper, February 15, 1917. Courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Image from Frank Leslie’s illustrated newspaper, February 15, 1917. Courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Walking to work today I reflected on the rocket’s red glare of recent Fourth of July fireworks displays and relished the aesthetic appeal of streets still adorned with bunting. Not ready to put away the fife and drum, I’m stirred to issue a call to action. Whether the source of inspiration is Independence Day, or upcoming events to commemorate the Civil War Sesquicentennial or War of 1812 Bicentennial, the mission remains to preserve the cultural heritage of our nation and protect the memory of American achievement and creativity.

The Library of Congress Digital Preservation Outreach and Education (DPOE) Program has joined the effort through building and maintaining a corps of professionals equipped to teach the fundamentals of digital preservation. DPOE’s overarching strategy is to foster outreach and education about digital preservation on a national scale. Tactically, the program has launched the 2014 DPOE Training Needs Assessment Survey to scan the information sector to get a sense of the state of digital preservation practice, and identify the capacity of organizations and professionals to effectively preserve digital content. The first survey was conducted in 2010, and this follow up activity will reveal any changes that have occurred in the last four year.

Data collected from the initial survey informed the development of the baseline DPOE Curriculum and training modules. These educational materials are used by instructors in the DPOE Train-the-Trainer Workshops, which are designed to provide hands-on, in-person continuing education opportunities for working professionals with little or no digital preservation experience, and increase the organizational capacity of their employers to provide long-term access to mission-critical digital content. To date the program has deployed volunteers across the United States from Washington, DC to Alaska to deliver workshops. Through these activities DPOE has established a strong community of external stakeholders, who have partnered with DPOE to continue to build and maintain a growing national trainer network, and share knowledge through program’s communications infrastructure.

DPOE wants you to join forces with the Library of Congress in the fight against digital obsolescence! I encourage you to participate in the 2014 DPOE Training Needs Assessment Survey today, or contact the program via email to discuss how you can host a DPOE Train-the-Trainer Workshop at your organization. Contribute to the DPOE Calendar to announce upcoming continuing education opportunities in your area. Join the DPOE List listserv to share information about digital preservation tools, services, and best practices to increase visibility of the little victories taking place across the information landscape.

Every organization has strengths to win a skirmish here and there, but together we can win the battle.

Categories: Planet DigiPres

2014-09-01 Preserving PDF - identify, validate, repair

OPF Wiki Activity Feed - 17 July 2014 - 11:23am

Page edited by Becky McGuinness

View Online Becky McGuinness 2014-07-17T11:23:27Z

2014-09-01 Preserving PDF - identify, validate, repair

OPF Wiki Activity Feed - 17 July 2014 - 10:36am

Page edited by Becky McGuinness

View Online Becky McGuinness 2014-07-17T10:36:26Z

Scoring, Not Storing: Digital Preservation Assessment Criteria at #digpres14

The Signal: Digital Preservation - 16 July 2014 - 6:44pm

The following is a guest post by Seth Anderson, consultant at AVPreserve.  This is part of an ongoing series of posts to highlight and preview the Digital Preservation 2014 program.  Here Seth previews the session he organized, “Digital Preservation Audit and Planning with ISO 16363 and NDSA Levels of Preservation,” scheduled for Wednesday, July 23 from 10:45-noon.

Seth Anderson

Seth Anderson

The idea of the trustworthy digital repository is now old enough to vote. It has been 18 years since this concept was introduced by the Task Force on Archiving of Digital Information in the 1996 report, “Preserving Digital Information,” (PDF) and during that time, our field has defined and refined what it means to digitally preserve. In 2014, the digital preservation community has now reached a level of maturity that allows us to evaluate preservation environments and services for their “trustworthiness,” thanks to resources, guidelines, and standards such as the international standard for trustworthy digital repositories (ISO 16363) and the NDSA Levels of Digital Preservation. These have become go-to resources for myself, my colleagues at AVPreserve, and many others in the field when assessing existing preservation and planning for new or future capabilities.

And yet though our field has matured, these resources themselves are in a way still immature because they have not been sufficiently stress-tested and assessed, and as a result there is little guidance to draw from on how they are best applied. The challenge is compounded by the fact that the application of a standard or guideline is often as unique as the organization using it. In digital preservation, no infrastructure or set of policies is alike, therefore, the way each organization uses tools like ISO 16363 and the NDSA Levels may differ. The preservation approach of an audiovisual archive may vary considerably from a repository for scientific research data. Making the findings of these assessment tools valuable and actionable requires a willingness to bend and adjust their framework to each individual preservation environment while remaining true to the spirit of the guideline.

NDSA Levels of Digital Preservation

NDSA Levels of Digital Preservation

There is currently a significant amount of work being done by NDSA members to develop approaches and recommended practices for the use of criteria to measure trustworthiness and maturity of digital preservation. Next week’s Digital Preservation 2014 conference will feature several of these. Each presentation will provide detail on how these resources are being applied by practitioners in the field, and describe new and creative ways in which they are being used to result in actionable outcomes.

John Faundeen, of the US Geological Survey, will present on his organization’s modification and expansion of the NDSA’s Levels of Digital Preservation to meet the unique needs of their science centers. This organization’s efforts provide an example of the Levels as a helpful, but also dynamic resource, able to scale to the additional needs of diverse organizations.

Bertram Lyons, a recent addition to the AVPreserve team, and part-time digital assets manager for the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, will discuss ongoing work to map the Levels of Digital Preservation assessment criteria to the requirements of ISO 16363. Bert’s work examines how the granular approach of ISO 16363 can be correlated with the high-level principles underlying the Levels of Digital Preservation to reveal parallels at their core. In application, Bert’s use of the Levels enables a new view of the ISO requirements, providing an easily understandable overview of the more detailed results of a full-scale audit.

A portion of the Self-Assessment Template for ISO 16363.

A portion of the Self-Assessment Template for ISO 16363.

Finally, my own presentation will cover recent efforts at AVPreserve to reframe the often information-heavy results of ISO 16363 audits into straightforward data points based on scoring criteria with actionable recommendations for achieving compliance. The presentation will include examples of different applications of the standard as a means of assessing developing digital preservation infrastructure and planning for completely new policies and systems. Additionally, extensive work with the standard has revealed inconsistencies and repetitive elements that cause confusion and difficulty in interpreting and applying the requirements of a trustworthy digital repository. I will posit an altered hierarchy, developed with my colleagues at AVPreserve, to address these issues in future versions of the standard, an approach that looks to such documents not as a static, inflexible set of guidelines, but pragmatically as a framework to apply and continually refine as results and technologies change, much like digital preservation itself!

Standards and guidelines can often seem rigid and narrowly applicable upon review, but we all know digital preservation is not a one-size-fits-all set of functionality and policy.  If it were, our jobs would be remarkably less fascinating and satisfying. These presentations argue for creative approaches to using the valuable tools we have in our field. I hope you will join us in Washington, DC and participate in the discussion on how we can improve on our collective understanding of the use of these tools.

Categories: Planet DigiPres

Evaluation of patients age for a given period

OPF Wiki Activity Feed - 16 July 2014 - 3:31pm

Page edited by Tomasz Hoffmann

View Online | Add Comment Tomasz Hoffmann 2014-07-16T15:31:23Z

Evaluation of patients age for a given period

SCAPE Wiki Activity Feed - 16 July 2014 - 3:31pm

Page edited by Tomasz Hoffmann

View Online | Add Comment Tomasz Hoffmann 2014-07-16T15:31:23Z
Categories: SCAPE