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U2 working with Apple to create new music format to combat piracy - Hollywood.com

Google News Search: "new file format" - 19 September 2014 - 1:14pm

U2 working with Apple to create new music format to combat piracy
Hollywood.com
In a new TIME magazine article, the singer has detailed the group's plans to help combat the illegal downloading of artists' music by creating a new file format which cannot be copied. The aim of the top secret project is to tempt fans to purchase full ...

and more »
Categories: Technology Watch

Emerging Collaborations for Accessing and Preserving Email

The Signal: Digital Preservation - 19 September 2014 - 1:02pm

The following is a guest post by Chris Prom, Assistant University Archivist and Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

I’ll never forget one lesson from my historical methods class at Marquette University.  Ronald Zupko–famous for his lecture about the bubonic plague and a natural showman–was expounding on what it means to interrogate primary sources–to cast a skeptical eye on every source, to see each one as a mere thread of evidence in a larger story, and to remember that every event can, and must, tell many different stories.

He asked us to name a few documentary genres, along with our opinions as to their relative value.  We shot back: “Photographs, diaries, reports, scrapbooks, newspaper articles,” along with the type of ill-informed comments graduate students are prone to make.  As our class rattled off responses, we gradually came to realize that each document reflected the particular viewpoint of its creator–and that the information a source conveyed was constrained by documentary conventions and other social factors inherent to the medium underlying the expression. Settling into the comfortable role of skeptics, we noted the biases each format reflected.  Finally, one student said: “What about correspondence?”  Dr Zupko erupted: “There is the real meat of history!  But, you need to be careful!”

problemInbox

Dangerous Inbox by Recrea HQ. Photo courtesy of Flickr through a CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 license.

Letters, memos, telegrams, postcards: such items have long been the stock-in-trade for archives.  Historians and researchers of all types, while mindful of the challenges in using correspondence, value it as a source for the insider perspective it provides on real-time events.   For this reason, the library and archives community must find effective ways to identify, preserve and provide access to email and other forms of electronic correspondence.

After I researched and wrote a guide to email preservation (pdf) for the Digital Preservation Coalition’s Technology Watch Report series, I concluded that the challenges are mostly cultural and administrative.

I have no doubt that with the right tools, archivists could do what we do best: build the relationships that underlie every successful archival acquisition.  Engaging records creators and donors in their digital spaces, we can help them preserve access to the records that are so sorely needed for those who will write histories.  But we need the tools, and a plan for how to use them.  Otherwise, our promises are mere words.

For this reason, I’m so pleased to report on the results of a recent online meeting organized by the National Digital Stewardship Alliance’s Standards and Practices Working Group.  On August 25, a group of fifty-plus experts from more than a dozen institutions informally shared the work they are doing to preserve email.

For me, the best part of the meeting was that it represented the diverse range of institutions (in terms of size and institutional focus) that are interested in this critical work. Email preservation is not something of interest only to large government archives,or to small collecting repositories, but also to every repository in between. That said, the representatives displayed a surprising similar vision for how email preservation can be made effective.

Robert Spangler, Lisa Haralampus, Ken  Hawkins and Kevin DeVorsey described challenges that the National Archives and Records Administration has faced in controlling and providing access to large bodies of email. Concluding that traditional records management practices are not sufficient to task, NARA has developed the Capstone approach, seeking to identify and preserve particular accounts that must be preserved as a record series, and is currently revising its transfer guidance.  Later in the meeting, Mark Conrad described the particular challenge of preserving email from the Executive Office of the President, highlighting the point that “scale matters”–a theme that resonated across the board.

The whole account approach that NARA advocates meshes well with activities described by other presenters.  For example, Kelly Eubank from North Carolina State Archives and the EMCAP project discussed the need for software tools to ingest and process email records while Linda Reib from the Arizona State Library noted that the PeDALS Project is seeking to continue their work, focusing on account-level preservation of key state government accounts.

Functional comparison of selected email archives tools/services. Courtesy Wendy Gogel.

Functional comparison of selected email archives tools/services. Courtesy Wendy Gogel.

Ricc Ferrante and Lynda Schmitz Fuhrig from the Smithsonian Institution Archives discussed the CERP project which produced, in conjunction with the EMCAP project, an XML schema for email objects among its deliverables. Kate Murray from the Library of Congress reviewed the new email and related calendaring formats on the Sustainability of Digital Formats website.

Harvard University was up next.  Andrea Goethels and Wendy Gogel shared information about Harvard’s Electronic Archiving Service.  EAS includes tools for normalizing email from an account into EML format (conforming to the Internet Engineering Task Force RFC 2822), then packaging it for deposit into Harvard’s digital repository.

One of the most exciting presentations was provided by Peter Chan and Glynn Edwards from Stanford University.  With generous funding from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, as well as some internal support, the ePADD Project (“Email: Process, Appraise, Discover, Deliver”) is using natural language processing and entity extraction tools to build an application that will allow archivists and records creators to review email, then process it for search, display and retrieval.  Best of all, the web-based application will include a built-in discovery interface and users will be able to define a lexicon and to provide visual representations of the results.  Many participants in the meeting commented that the ePADD tools may provided a meaningful focus for additional collaborations.  A beta version is due out next spring.

In the discussion that followed the informal presentations, several presenters congratulated the Harvard team on a slide Wendy Gogel shared, comparing the functions provided by various tools and services (reproduced above).

As is apparent from even a cursory glance at the chart, repositories are doing wonderful work—and much yet remains.

Collaboration is the way forward. At the end of the discussion, participants agreed to take three specific steps to drive email preservation initiatives to the next level: (1) providing tool demo sessions; (2) developing use cases; and (3) working together.

The bottom line: I’m more hopeful about the ability of the digital preservation community to develop an effective approach toward email preservation than I have been in years.  Stay tuned for future developments!

Categories: Planet DigiPres

U2 working with Apple to create new music format to combat piracy - Express.co.uk

Google News Search: "new file format" - 19 September 2014 - 8:55am

Express.co.uk

U2 working with Apple to create new music format to combat piracy
Express.co.uk
In a new TIME magazine article, the singer has detailed the group's plans to help combat the illegal downloading of artists' music by creating a new file format which cannot be copied. The aim of the top secret project is to tempt fans to purchase full ...
Bono: U2 free album delivery was 'punk rock', now I'll save the music industrySydney Morning Herald

all 48 news articles »
Categories: Technology Watch

Time - U2 Working With Apple To Create New Music Format To Combat Piracy - Contactmusic.com

Google News Search: "new file format" - 19 September 2014 - 7:02am

AceShowbiz

Time - U2 Working With Apple To Create New Music Format To Combat Piracy
Contactmusic.com
In a new Time magazine article, the singer has detailed the group's plans to help combat the illegal downloading of artists' music by creating a new file format which cannot be copied. The aim of the top secret project is to tempt fans to purchase full ...
Bono: U2 free album delivery was 'punk rock', now I'll save the music industrySydney Morning Herald

all 38 news articles »
Categories: Technology Watch

Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level

OPF Wiki Activity Feed - 19 September 2014 - 6:53am

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Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level

SCAPE Wiki Activity Feed - 19 September 2014 - 6:53am

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Categories: SCAPE

Bono: U2 free album delivery was 'punk rock', now I'll save the music industry - Sydney Morning Herald

Google News Search: "new file format" - 19 September 2014 - 1:30am

Sydney Morning Herald

Bono: U2 free album delivery was 'punk rock', now I'll save the music industry
Sydney Morning Herald
Now Bono has told Time magazine that he's working with Apple on an even bigger project: a new file format that could save the music industry. The band's 14th album will be delivered on the new format. He told Time: "[it will be] an audiovisual ...

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Categories: Technology Watch

Apple, U2 Working On New Music File Format - PropertyOfZack

Google News Search: "new file format" - 18 September 2014 - 9:59pm

Music Times

Apple, U2 Working On New Music File Format
PropertyOfZack
In Time's forthcoming cover story, Bono hints that the band's next record is “about 18 months away” and will be released under the new file format. “I think it's going to get very exciting for the music business,” Bono tells Time, “[it will be] an ...
U2, Apple Working on New Music File Format to Combat Piracy, Create an ...Music Times
U2 And Apple Reveal Their Next Surprise TogetherFDRMX

all 336 news articles »
Categories: Technology Watch

U2, Apple Working on New Music File Format to Combat Piracy, Create an ... - Music Times

Google News Search: "new file format" - 18 September 2014 - 3:37pm

Music Times

U2, Apple Working on New Music File Format to Combat Piracy, Create an ...
Music Times
According to a forthcoming TIME cover story, U2 and Apple are working on a new file format that will be too enticing for music fans to ignore. Bono told the magazine that "he hopes that a new digital music format in the works will prove so irresistibly ...
Apple, U2 Working On New Music File FormatPropertyOfZack
U2 And Apple Reveal Their Next Surprise TogetherFDRMX

all 336 news articles »
Categories: Technology Watch

The return of music DRM?

File Formats Blog - 18 September 2014 - 12:58pm

U2, already the most hated band in the world thanks to its invading millions of iOS devices with unsolicited files, isn’t stopping. An article on Time‘s website tells us, in vague terms, that

Bono, Edge, Adam Clayton and Larry Mullen Jr believe so strongly that artists should be compensated for their work that they have embarked on a secret project with Apple to try to make that happen, no easy task when free-to-access music is everywhere (no) thanks to piracy and legitimate websites such as YouTube. Bono tells TIME he hopes that a new digital music format in the works will prove so irresistibly exciting to music fans that it will tempt them again into buying music—whole albums as well as individual tracks.

It’s hard to read this as anything but an attempt to bring digital rights management (DRM) back to online music distribution. Users emphatically rejected it years ago, and Apple was among the first to drop it. You haven’t really “bought” anything with DRM on it; you’ve merely leased it for as long as the vendor chooses to support it. People will continue to break DRM, if only to avoid the risk of loss. The illegal copies will offer greater value than legal ones.

It would be nice to think that what U2 and Apple really mean is just that the new format will offer so much better quality that people will gladly pay for it, but that’s unlikely. Higher-quality formats such as AAC have been around for a long time, and they haven’t pushed the old standby MP3 out of the picture. Existing levels of quality are good enough for most buyers, and vendors know it.

Time implies that YouTube doesn’t compensate artists for their work. This is false. They often don’t bother with small independent musicians, though they will if they’re reminded hard enough (as Heather Dale found out), but it’s hard to believe that groups with powerful lawyers, such as U2, aren’t being compensated for every view.

DRM and force-feeding of albums are two sides of the same coin of vendor control over our choices. This new move shouldn’t be a surprise.


Tagged: Apple, audio, DRM
Categories: Planet DigiPres

Report: Apple and U2 to Debut New Music File Format - Billboard

Google News Search: "new file format" - 18 September 2014 - 12:48pm

Billboard

Report: Apple and U2 to Debut New Music File Format
Billboard
With consumer behavior, and the record industry with it, predicted to pivot so dramatically towards access over ownership in the next five years, it's questionable whether a new file format, even a low-size, high-quality (and possibly locked down with ...

and more »
Categories: Technology Watch

SCAPE Project Ends on the 30th of September

Open Planets Foundation Blogs - 18 September 2014 - 12:11pm

It is difficult to write that headline. After nearly four years of hard work, worry, setbacks, triumphs, weariness, and exultation, the SCAPE project is finally coming to an end.

I am convinced that I will look back at this period as one of the highlights of my career. I hope that many of my SCAPE colleagues will feel the same way.

I believe SCAPE was an outstanding example of a successful European project, characterised by

  • an impressive level of trouble-free international cooperation;
  • sustained effort and dedication from all project partners;
  • high quality deliverables and excellent review ratings;
  • a large number of amazing results, including more software tools than we can demonstrate in one day!

I also believe SCAPE has made and will continue to make a significant impact on the community and practice of digital preservation. We have achieved this impact through

I would like to thank all the people who contributed to the SCAPE project, who are far too numerous to name here. In particular I would like to thank our General Assembly members, our Executive Board/Sub-project leads, the Work Package leads, and the SCAPE Office, all of whom have contributed to the joy and success of SCAPE.

Finally, I would like to thank the OPF for ensuring that the SCAPE legacy will continue to live and even grow long after the project itself is just a fond memory.

It's been a pleasure folks. Well done!

Preservation Topics: SCAPE
Categories: Planet DigiPres

SCAPE Project Ends on the 30th of September

SCAPE Blog Posts - 18 September 2014 - 12:11pm

It is difficult to write that headline. After nearly four years of hard work, worry, setbacks, triumphs, weariness, and exultation, the SCAPE project is finally coming to an end.

I am convinced that I will look back at this period as one of the highlights of my career. I hope that many of my SCAPE colleagues will feel the same way.

I believe SCAPE was an outstanding example of a successful European project, characterised by

  • an impressive level of trouble-free international cooperation;
  • sustained effort and dedication from all project partners;
  • high quality deliverables and excellent review ratings;
  • a large number of amazing results, including more software tools than we can demonstrate in one day!

I also believe SCAPE has made and will continue to make a significant impact on the community and practice of digital preservation. We have achieved this impact through

I would like to thank all the people who contributed to the SCAPE project, who are far too numerous to name here. In particular I would like to thank our General Assembly members, our Executive Board/Sub-project leads, the Work Package leads, and the SCAPE Office, all of whom have contributed to the joy and success of SCAPE.

Finally, I would like to thank the OPF for ensuring that the SCAPE legacy will continue to live and even grow long after the project itself is just a fond memory.

It's been a pleasure folks. Well done!

Preservation Topics: SCAPE
Categories: SCAPE

Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level

OPF Wiki Activity Feed - 18 September 2014 - 5:57am

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View Online | Add Comment Jette Junge 2014-09-18T05:57:56Z

Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level

SCAPE Wiki Activity Feed - 18 September 2014 - 5:57am

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View Online | Add Comment Jette Junge 2014-09-18T05:57:56Z
Categories: SCAPE

Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level > Elcovs Fay.jpg

OPF Wiki Activity Feed - 18 September 2014 - 5:56am

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Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level > Elcovs Fay.jpg

SCAPE Wiki Activity Feed - 18 September 2014 - 5:56am

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Categories: SCAPE

Digital Preservation Sustainability on the EU Policy Level > Elcovs King.jpg

OPF Wiki Activity Feed - 18 September 2014 - 5:55am

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SCAPE Wiki Activity Feed - 18 September 2014 - 5:55am

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Categories: SCAPE

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OPF Wiki Activity Feed - 18 September 2014 - 5:55am

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